Jack Sullivan

Senior Investigative Reporter, CommonWealth

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan is a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for nearly three decades. Prior to joining CommonWealth, he was editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. As the Ledger editorial page editor, he won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan is a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for nearly three decades. Prior to joining CommonWealth, he was editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. As the Ledger editorial page editor, he won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

Stories by Jack Sullivan

Pot opponents mislead on costs, local aid threat

Pot opponents mislead on costs, local aid threat

Referendum critics falsely claim Colorado revenues fail to cover regulation expenses

LT. GOV. KARYN POLITO suggested earlier this week that passage of the ballot question legalizing recreational marijuana could lead to a reduction in local aid to pay for regulating the new industry and public safety costs, but there is little evidence to support her claim. At a meeting of the Local Government Advisory Commission on Tuesday,(...)

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MBTA to double capital spending

MBTA to double capital spending

Authority plans to quicken bid process, tap unused funds

MBTA OFFICIALS SAY they want to overhaul the process and change the culture at the agency to ramp up spending on capital projects after once again finishing the year without using all the funds available to address the aging equipment and infrastructure that breaks down and causes delays regardless of the season. “We believe we(...)

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Union protests T privatizing

Union protests T privatizing

Workers blast Baker and board for refusing to discuss alternatives

HUNDREDS OF ORANGE-CLAD MBTA union workers and supporters crammed the Fiscal and Management Control Board meeting Monday to loudly — and, in some cases, profanely – protest the administration’s efforts to privatize agency services. “We think it is time we make our voice heard,” said Carmen’s Union President James O’Brien. “For months, we have attempted(...)

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Joyce absolved of wrongdoing

Joyce absolved of wrongdoing

Milton official says senator obtained all needed permits

SEN. BRIAN JOYCE obtained all the required permits to renovate his home, according to a report by the Milton Town Administrator that rebuts questions raised in a newspaper article over whether the lawmaker clandestinely renovated his house without town officials’ knowledge. “Based upon my review of these files and my consultation with the Building Commissioner, I conclude that the(...)

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Baker says DCR suspensions send right message

Baker says DCR suspensions send right message

Top 2 officials used state resources for private party

GOV. CHARLIE BAKER on Wednesday applauded one of his cabinet secretaries for handing out one-week suspensions without pay to the top two officials at the Department of Conservation and Recreation for using state resources to host a private party. “This is exactly the right kind of message,” Baker said at an event in Plymouth. “It’s(...)

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Milton board backs Joyce

Milton board backs Joyce

Vows to reassess senator's home, but says he did nothing wrong

THE THREE MEMBERS of the Milton Board of Assessors said on Tuesday that they will review and probably reassess state Sen. Brian Joyce’s home, but they indicated the lawmaker had done nothing wrong. The hearing was held in the wake of a Boston Globe story last week that charged that Joyce’s home was vastly undervalued(...)

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Questions raised over Globe’s Joyce story

Questions raised over Globe’s Joyce story

Assessor says all necessary permits were pulled

MILTON TOWN RECORDS and interviews with local officials are calling into question the accuracy of a Boston Globe story suggesting embattled state Sen. Brian Joyce shortchanged the municipality on property taxes. Last week, the Boston Globe ran a page one story under the all-caps headline “SENATOR’S RENOVATIONS A SURPRISE TO ASSESSORS.” The story, accompanied by(...)

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AG’s gun communications lacking

AG’s gun communications lacking

Healey gave conflicting accounts of who, when, and how dealers and others were notified

Two weeks after Attorney General Maura Healey announced her crackdown on assault weapons sales, there is still confusion over how and when she issued her directive, whether she did or should have consulted with legislative leaders, and how much notice dealers actually received for when the order took effect. In addition, many dealers are still(...)

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T to pay $400 million for mandated safety system

T to pay $400 million for mandated safety system

Feds will provide bulk of money in low-interest loans

MBTA OFFICIALS SAY a mandatory $460 million system to ensure rail safety is on track to be installed by 2020 but though they claim it’s an 80-20 split with the federal government for funding, the cash-strapped authority will end up picking up 87 percent of the cost because the bulk of the money from Washington(...)

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T union claims cash uncollected

T union claims cash uncollected

MBTA officials deny riders let in for free when machines shut down

THE HEAD OF the MBTA’s Carmen’s Union ramped up his assault on the agency’s move to privatize money collection, claiming the first week of a new system resulted in untold lost revenue from streams of riders going through open gates for free triggered by fare vending machines that wouldn’t work because they were too stuffed(...)

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