Jack Sullivan

Senior Investigative Reporter, CommonWealth

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan is a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for nearly three decades. Prior to joining CommonWealth, he was editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. As the Ledger editorial page editor, he won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan is a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for nearly three decades. Prior to joining CommonWealth, he was editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. As the Ledger editorial page editor, he won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

Stories by Jack Sullivan

Hedge fund could lose millions for campaign violation

Hedge fund could lose millions for campaign violation

Contribution to gubernatorial candidate violated “pay for play”

A $500 CAMPAIGN donation to a family friend running for Massachusetts governor could potentially cost a New York hedge fund millions of dollars in its management fees of investments from the state’s pension fund. Pershing Square Capital Management, run by activist investment billionaire William Ackman, faces the loss of two years of management fees because(...)

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Banking on the pot industry

Banking on the pot industry

Conflicts with state laws and federal regulations create anxiety for most banks

AT LEAST ONE Massachusetts bank is offering services to the nascent legal marijuana industry in the state despite uncertainty over federal drug and banking regulations that still classify all pot sales as money-laundering, making it a risky venture both for the businesses and financial institutions. According to marijuana and banking industry officials, family-owned Century Bank(...)

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Audit: Plainridge Casino falls short in hiring goals

Audit: Plainridge Casino falls short in hiring goals

Report says gaming commission at fault for not monitoring agreement

A NEW AUDIT says the Massachusetts Gaming Commission dropped the ball in its mandate to ensure that Plainridge Park Casino met its agreed-upon local hiring goals and that the state’s only slots parlor failed to garnish winnings of patrons to pay back delinquent child support. “Allowing Plainridge to not accomplish its plan goals could result(...)

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South Station commuter rail accident unreported

South Station commuter rail accident unreported

Train hit safety stop but incident compared to fatal NJ crash

A PREVIOUSLY UNREPORTED incident in which a commuter rail train that struck a bumper at South Station was similar to an accident in Hoboken, NJ, earlier in the fall that killed one person and injured 100 more, said the MBTA’s top safety official. Ronald Nickle, the T’s chief safety officer, said had the train been(...)

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T eyes increase in executive salaries

T eyes increase in executive salaries

Agency pay for top management 25 percent below national average

DESPITE THE MBTA’s reputation as a wasteful state agency bloated with overpaid employees, the board that oversees the agency thinks upper management is underpaid and that low-balling those positions will make it hard to attract top-flight administrators. Steven Poftak, a member of the T’s Fiscal and Management Control Board, made a presentation to fellow board(...)

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Pot proponents hit critics on ‘scare tactics’

Pot proponents hit critics on ‘scare tactics’

Say officials are spreading falsehoods to defeat legalization measure

A LAWYER WHO helped draft the initiative to legalize adult recreational use of marijuana said critics of the referendum are using decades-old scare tactics to defeat the proposal and twisting proponents’ words to convince voters there’s a heartless pot industry that only wants to cash in at the expense of kids. “This whole idea that(...)

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Business unusual at the T

Business unusual at the T

Unsolicited proposals to privatize services pique officials’ interest

IT’S A MANTRA spoken so often these days it could be a bumper sticker. “The MBTA is open for business,” Brian Shortsleeve, the agency’s chief administrator and acting general manager, said in talking about unsolicited proposals for third-party vendors to operate T services. Shortsleeve thinks it’s so important for people to know “the MBTA is open(...)

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A wasted vote of conscience

A wasted vote of conscience

Most write-ins get lumped together under ‘others’  

IN THIS PERIOD of discontent with the Republican and Democratic nominees for president, many Massachusetts voters are talking about writing in their own candidate when they enter the voting booth on Nov. 8. But while a write-in vote may be a feel-good act of personal protest, it won’t mean much because a peculiarity of Massachusetts(...)

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Prices biggest cause for rising health costs

Prices biggest cause for rising health costs

Spending rose more slowly than previous year but still above state goal

IT’S THE PRICE, stupid. That was the message delivered at the first day of annual state hearings on health care cost trends with experts and officials pointing the finger at pharmaceutical costs coupled with federal red tape in approving new drugs as key factors keeping Massachusetts from meeting spending goals Health care spending in Massachusetts(...)

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