Jack Sullivan

Senior Investigative Reporter, CommonWealth

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan, a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for more than two decades, was most recently editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the 2003 New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's 2002 award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. He also won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan, a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for more than two decades, was most recently editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the 2003 New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's 2002 award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. He also won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

Stories by Jack Sullivan

Lawmakers not sold on pot

Lawmakers not sold on pot

House rallies opposition to legal marijuana ballot question

MASSACHUSETTS LAWMAKERS OPPOSED to legalizing marijuana brought in an array of law enforcement officials as well as a buffet of kid-enticing pot products to try to scare the state straight before a ballot question to regulate the weed makes it before voters in November. “This entire Commonwealth has been affected by the opioid addiction crisis,” said(...)

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Smoking out support for legalizing pot

Smoking out support for legalizing pot

Former assistant AG leads the effort

THERE IS A MOVEMENT AFOOT to light up the smoking lamp in Massachusetts, if you will. A Washington, DC-based group with wired-in local connections is on the verge of placing a ballot question before voters to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, the latest step in bringing pot-smoking into the mainstream. Will Luzier is a(...)

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Uber uses threats, political pressure to thwart regs

Uber uses threats, political pressure to thwart regs

Company selectively pulls out from some areas requiring fingerprints

AS LAWMAKERS CONTINUE to work on legislation to regulate the emerging ride-hailing industry in Massachusetts, the biggest sticking point appears to be mandating fingerprints for drivers, a move that has triggered threats by transportation network companies such as Uber to pull up stakes in places where such a policy has been instituted. While no Uber(...)

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All aboard

All aboard

How crowded is too crowded for MBTA passengers?

WHEN IS ENOUGH enough when it comes to crowded trains? For about 20 percent of those who ride the MBTA, apparently there is nothing that will stop them from trying to squeeze onto a packed subway car. As transit officials try to come up with some metrics to increase rider satisfaction, focusing more on customers’(...)

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Senate puts teeth into public records reform

Senate puts teeth into public records reform

Bill differs vastly with House measure but still leaves governor and Legislature exempt

THE STATE SENATE unveiled its version of Public Records reform, potentially the first major overhaul since the law was enacted in 1973, placing a hard time limit on responses, requiring courts to award attorneys’ fees if a requester is wrongly denied, mandating electronic records be provided, and restricting fees for compliance and copies. The bill, which(...)

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Another $80 million debt for MBTA

Another $80 million debt for MBTA

Audit reveals agency has been paying deferred comp to retired managers without funding

THE CASH-STRAPPED MBTA, with a seemingly bottomless supply of bad financial news, received another jolt on Wednesday when an audit revealed the agency owes about $80 million to retired agency executives who were promised extra money in exchange for leaving the Carmen’s Union to work in management. Shawn Warren, an auditor for KPMG, which did(...)

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Report: MBTA knew two years ago about Green Line ext. overruns

Report: MBTA knew two years ago about Green Line ext. overruns

T releases sealed record after losing public records appeal

MBTA OFFICIALS KNEW or should have known more than two years ago that the price of the Green Line extension was running far beyond initial estimates, long before officials say they were caught off-guard by the mind-boggling increase that caused officials to scrap the construction contracts and start over, according to a previously sealed report.(...)

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Galvin orders T to release Green Line ext. report

Galvin orders T to release Green Line ext. report

Secretary of State says agency can’t claim attorney-client privilege

THE SECRETARY OF STATE HAS ORDERED the MBTA to release a sealed consultant’s report on the botched Green Line extension, saying the embattled agency could not withhold the document because of attorney-client privilege or a separate “deliberative process” exemption under the Public Records Law. The decision came in the wake of two appeals filed under(...)

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Closed doors

Closed doors

Newton supports affordable housing — until it’s time to build it

Photographs by Michael Manning   IN NEWTON, WHERE single-family home values are creeping into the million-dollar range, few things trigger more raw emotion than proposals for affordable housing. That emotion was on full display in early December at Newton City Hall as proponents and opponents of a mixed-use development packed the Board of Aldermen meeting(...)

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Public schools extend their reach

School systems across Massachusetts are boosting their revenue by taking in students from as far away as China

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS AROUND the state, faced with rising costs and stagnant budgets, are turning outside their districts —even outside the country—to attract tuition money from foreign students and students from other communities inside Massachusetts. The money falls into three pots. According to fiscal 2014 figures from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 21 public(...)

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