Jack Sullivan

Senior Investigative Reporter, CommonWealth

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan, a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for more than two decades, was most recently editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the 2003 New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's 2002 award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. He also won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan, a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for more than two decades, was most recently editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the 2003 New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's 2002 award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. He also won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

Stories by Jack Sullivan

Tracking the EMK Institute’s funding

Tracking the EMK Institute’s funding

Conflicting views on UMass role

THE NEW EDWARD M. KENNEDY INSTITUTE is a marvel of a museum, an architecturally breathtaking building that attempts to educate visitors about the role and operations of the US Senate. It is run by a nonprofit foundation whose funding comes from private donors, the federal government, the state of Massachusetts, and the University of Massachusetts,(...)

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First out of the blocks

First out of the blocks

Boston City Councilor Josh Zakim says he’s encouraged by the call for a statewide referendum on the Olympics but still wants a Boston vote this fall.

You were the first to formally move for ballot questions on the Olympics for Boston voters. The Boston 2024 organizers have now called for a statewide referendum. Does that affect your plan? I’m very encouraged by that. But I’d want to take a look at the language before making any decisions. Could there be two(...)

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Sketchy federal program sells citizenship

Sketchy federal program sells citizenship

Green cards go to foreigners who invest $500,000

Photos by Michael Manning THE BASTILLE KITCHEN is the kind of destination restaurant that stamps a redeveloped neighborhood as a success. The Innovation District bistro, owned in part by renowned restaurateur and nightclub czar Seth Greenberg, draws such bold-faced names as Derek Jeter and Scott Brown and adds an air of panache to the renovated(...)

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Still bridging divides

Still bridging divides

At opening of institute, everyone hails Kennedy’s willingness to reach out

IN 2007, WHEN I was editorial page editor at the Patriot Ledger in Quincy, I wrote an editorial for the paper’s support of the immigration reform bill before Congress. It wasn’t the usual fare for a local newspaper such as ours, but because it was sponsored by then-Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, it had that local(...)

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Crime brings together unlikely bedfellows

Crime brings together unlikely bedfellows

Coalition of political opposites looks to reform criminal justice system

WHAT DO THE liberal Center for American Progress, tea party-infused FreedomWorks, the American Civil Liberties Union, and the ultra-conservative Koch brothers have in common? Not much, but they have banded together in an unlikely alliance to push for reform of the country’s criminal justice system. Christine Leonard, a former aide to several members of the(...)

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Gants blames DAs for lack of reform

Gants blames DAs for lack of reform

State’s top judge says prosecutors don’t want to cede discretion in sentencing to judges

THE STATE’S TOP judge went all-in on his call to eliminate minimum mandatory sentences for drug offenders, saying the state’s prosecutors “hold the cards” and are the biggest obstacle to sentencing reform because they don’t want to cede power to judges to make the determination on incarceration. “Let us be honest: When some district attorneys(...)

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The price of leadership

The price of leadership

Hecht, who bucked DeLeo on term limits, is demoted

CORRECTION: Several corrections were made to the original version of this story, all of them dealing with the pay of leadership positions in the House. Specifically, Rep. Jonathan Hecht’s leadership stipend was incorrect in the original version, as were the stipends of Reps. Harold Naughton, Patricia Haddad, Byron Rushing, and the heads of the two(...)

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Blizzard burying Olympics bid?

It’s easy to forget in the mind- and finger-numbing midst of Snowmaggedon about Boston’s 2024 Olympic bid – easy to forget, that is, if you don’t pay attention to everyone decrying the shape of the MBTA and what it will be like in eight years should millions of visitors from around the world descend on the(...)

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Partners surrenders

Partners surrenders

Health care giant drops purchase of South Shore Hospital, pauses on Hallmark

PARTNERS HEALTHCARE HAS agreed to end its controversial pursuit of South Shore Hospital and will hold off on acquiring two Hallmark Health hospitals on the North Shore for the time being less than three weeks after a Superior Court judge delivered a crippling blow to the health care giant’s vast expansion plans. Lawyers for Partners,(...)

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