Greg Torres

Publisher, CommonWealth

About Greg Torres

Greg Torres joined MassINC in June of 2007. As president, he is responsible to the board of directors for setting policy, leading fund raising activities, and guiding program operations. Greg also serves as publisher of CommonWealth magazine, now a leader in investigative journalism.

Greg began his career working with juvenile delinquents in the early 1970s in Boston. As the deinstitutionalization movement proceeded, Greg was instrumental in developing community-based programs for adolescents with his work at the Massachusetts Committee on Criminal Justice. As assistant secretary for criminal justice under Governor Michael Dukakis, he led reform efforts in the adult correctional system as well. From 1984-1992 Greg served as chief of staff to the Massachusetts Senate Committee on Ways and Means.

In 1992 Greg joined the MENTOR Network as senior vice president, having served as a founding board member in 1980. Assuming the role of president and CEO from 1996-2005, Greg led the growth of MENTOR from a regional company providing services primarily to children into a national organization serving people of all ages in a wide variety of settings, now operating in 37 states. Having retired as CEO, Greg continues to chair the board of the MENTOR Network.

Greg is a graduate of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (MPA 1982) and of St. Vincent’s College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania (BA 1971). Greg chaired the board of Roca, a Chelsea-based organization from 2006-2009. He lives in Winchester with his wife Betsy Pattullo. They have two sons, Jess and Gabe, and three grandchildren, Jack , Lydia, and Quinn.

About Greg Torres

Greg Torres joined MassINC in June of 2007. As president, he is responsible to the board of directors for setting policy, leading fund raising activities, and guiding program operations. Greg also serves as publisher of CommonWealth magazine, now a leader in investigative journalism.

Greg began his career working with juvenile delinquents in the early 1970s in Boston. As the deinstitutionalization movement proceeded, Greg was instrumental in developing community-based programs for adolescents with his work at the Massachusetts Committee on Criminal Justice. As assistant secretary for criminal justice under Governor Michael Dukakis, he led reform efforts in the adult correctional system as well. From 1984-1992 Greg served as chief of staff to the Massachusetts Senate Committee on Ways and Means.

In 1992 Greg joined the MENTOR Network as senior vice president, having served as a founding board member in 1980. Assuming the role of president and CEO from 1996-2005, Greg led the growth of MENTOR from a regional company providing services primarily to children into a national organization serving people of all ages in a wide variety of settings, now operating in 37 states. Having retired as CEO, Greg continues to chair the board of the MENTOR Network.

Greg is a graduate of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (MPA 1982) and of St. Vincent’s College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania (BA 1971). Greg chaired the board of Roca, a Chelsea-based organization from 2006-2009. He lives in Winchester with his wife Betsy Pattullo. They have two sons, Jess and Gabe, and three grandchildren, Jack , Lydia, and Quinn.

Stories by Greg Torres

A novel idea

A novel idea

Tripp Jones, a lifelong Democrat somewhat frustrated with his own party, hit on the idea of creating a nonpartisan think tank and an independent magazine

tripp jones traces most of his career path, including the founding of MassINC 15 years ago, to a chance meeting in Washington, DC, in 1986. At the time, Jones was in the middle of his sophomore year at Hamilton College in New York, and he was interviewing for an internship in the state of New(...)

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Cap gains fix goes halfway

Cap gains fix goes halfway

Spending changes also needed to create budget stability

One of the biggest thorns in the state budget has been overreliance on revenue from the tax levied on capital gains. In good times, the capital gains tax funds programs and services and supports an operating reserve. But in bad times, this revenue evaporates. Long overdue reform to smooth spending to accommodate these fluctuations was(...)

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