Michael Jonas

Executive Editor, CommonWealth

About Michael Jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in journalism in Massachusetts since the early 1980s. Before joining the CommonWealth staff in early 2001, he was a contributing writer for the magazine for two years. His cover story in CommonWealth's Fall 1999 issue on Boston youth outreach workers was selected for a PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency.

Michael got his start in journalism at the Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston's largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the Boston Sunday Globe's City Weekly section.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989, he was a co-producer for "The AIDS Quarterly," a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s, he worked as a producer for "Our Times," a weekly magazine program on WHDH-TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

About Michael Jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in journalism in Massachusetts since the early 1980s. Before joining the CommonWealth staff in early 2001, he was a contributing writer for the magazine for two years. His cover story in CommonWealth's Fall 1999 issue on Boston youth outreach workers was selected for a PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency.

Michael got his start in journalism at the Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston's largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the Boston Sunday Globe's City Weekly section.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989, he was a co-producer for "The AIDS Quarterly," a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s, he worked as a producer for "Our Times," a weekly magazine program on WHDH-TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

Stories by Michael Jonas

Governor Fix-It’s fix-it man

Governor Fix-It’s fix-it man

Steve Kadish is the guy in charge of delivering on Charlie Baker’s vow to make state government work

Photographs by Frank Curran STEVE KADISH IS up most days before 5 a.m. After making coffee for himself and his wife and packing lunches for each of them, he sends his first email by 5:30, one of dozens that will go out in a day checking on progress addressing a problem in state government. When(...)

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A call to action

A call to action

Tanisha Sullivan, the incoming president of the Boston NAACP, thinks the city can ‘get it right’ when it comes to race issues

Photograph by Frank Curran What’s at the top of your agenda as you prepare to take over as the new president of the Boston NAACP? It really is a continuation of the work that the NAACP historically has done. There are five key areas that I would say we will continue to focus on: criminal(...)

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Was Baker privately ‘With Her’?

Was Baker privately ‘With Her’?

Trump presents a boatload of headaches a Clinton win would have avoided

GOV. CHARLIE BAKER is heading to Washington later this month to attend fellow Republican Donald Trump’s inauguration. But would he have been happier to be attending Hillary Clinton’s swearing-in? Of course, the state’s governor famously staked out a position of absolute neutrality in the presidential contest. Early on, Baker declared Trump a non-starter in his(...)

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Rosenberg hews to liberal agenda

Rosenberg hews to liberal agenda

Senate leader calls for investments as Beacon Hill gets back to business

SENATE PRESIDENT STAN ROSENBERG offered a snapshot of his legislative priorities for the coming session, zeroing in on the need to invest in education and transportation, and enact criminal justice reform. The liberal lawmaker staked out ground that contrasts sharply with the state’s tax-averse governor, who has been forced to make budget cuts several times(...)

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Highest and best use

Highest and best use

Baker touts development of surplus state property

ROBERT KENNEDY famously paraphrased George Bernard Shaw in a 1968 campaign speech when he said, “Some people see things as they are and say, why? I dream things that never were and say, why not?” Charlie Baker offered his own decidedly more prosaic version of that this afternoon. “Normally, people look at it and see(...)

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Activists interrupt criminal justice meeting

Activists interrupt criminal justice meeting

Advocates worried reform bill won’t address sentencing issues

CHANTING “JOBS NOT JAIL,” advocates for criminal justice reform briefly disrupted the final meeting of a state criminal justice policy commission today, part of a growing chorus of voices expressing concern that state leaders are preparing to put forward legislation that won’t include major changes to sentencing laws. The protest came as advocates and lawmakers(...)

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Bishops press Beacon Hill for criminal justice reform   

Bishops press Beacon Hill for criminal justice reform  

Catholic leaders urge end to mandatory minimum drug sentences, other changes

THE STATE’S FOUR Catholic bishops are adding their voices to those calling for the Legislature to take up a comprehensive criminal justice reform bill when lawmakers reconvene for a new session next month. In a letter sent last week to state leaders, the bishops urged adoption of “comprehensive thoughtful reforms” that can “reduce recidivism and(...)

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Probation fees hit poor the hardest, says report

Probation fees hit poor the hardest, says report

Court charges seen as barrier to offenders getting on track

MONTHLY FEES CHARGED to those on probation in Massachusetts disproportionately hit poorer communities, a costly obstacle to rehabilitation for those least able to afford it, according to a new study. About 67,000 people are on probation in the state and are charged a monthly fee of $50 or $65 depending on the level of court(...)

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Teachers union president decries Trump and testing

Teachers union president decries Trump and testing

MTA head urges teachers to stand up to hate -- and state assessments

BARBARA MADELONI, the president of the Massachusetts Teachers Association, had a message last week for her union’s members in the wake of the presidential election: “let all of our students and their families — but especially those who were targeted by the president-elect in his campaign — know that we will provide safe spaces, defend(...)

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Leaders declare Mass. ‘no place for hate’

Leaders declare Mass. ‘no place for hate’

Hundreds gather to decry election fallout

POLITICAL AND COMMUNITY leaders stood on the steps of the Massachusetts State House to speak out against acts of bigotry and violence that they say have surged in the wake of Donald Trump’s election as president. Several hundred people gathered on a cold Monday morning as speakers vowed to confront racism and other forms of(...)

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