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Mass. chiefs approve most gun permits

Mass. chiefs approve most gun permits

Only 1.8% of applicants denied, suggesting discretion not abused

ONLY A TINY fraction of Massachusetts residents who apply for firearms licenses or identification cards are turned down, suggesting the state’s reputation for restricting gun use may be overstated. Just 1.8 percent of those who applied for Firearms Identification Cards (FID) and licenses to carry concealed weapons between 2010 and 2015 were rejected, according to(...)

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Gateway Cities preoccupied with panhandling

Gateway Cities preoccupied with panhandling

Towns say beggars are bad for business, public safety

IN NEW BEDFORD, the City Council considered requiring panhandlers to get licenses to ask for money in the city. Manchester, New Hampshire, banned the exchange of items of value between motorists and pedestrians. And Worcester and Lowell enacted ordinances aimed at cracking down on “aggressive panhandling,” which, among other things, banned soliciting in close proximity(...)

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Slow, steady on military sex assaults

Slow, steady on military sex assaults

Tsongas having impact focusing on incremental change

SHORTLY AFTER TAKING HER SEAT in the House in 2007, US Rep. Niki Tsongas of Lowell attended a luncheon for soldiers wounded in combat. Tsongas approached some women at the luncheon and mentioned a recent hearing she’d attended on sexual assault in the military. One of the women, a military nurse, told her that she(...)

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Harvard’s blank canvas

Harvard’s blank canvas

Take a left on Cattle Drive and go to the end

I WAS STANDING on the roof of the Doubletree Hotel along Soldiers Field Road, looking down at what could easily be described as a whole lot of nothing. But that was sort of the point. Harvard University has bought up an enormous amount of the land surrounding the hotel on the Boston side of the(...)

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MA congressional delegation itching for change

MA congressional delegation itching for change

Most want to end seniority; some want to dump Pelosi

GOING INTO THE 2016 ELECTION, Republicans hold 246 seats in the House of Representatives. Democrats have 188. For Massachusetts, with its nine-member, all-Democrat delegation, this is a very bad situation and one that’s unlikely to get better any time soon. Among the nine, the angst is palpable. The minority party in the House enjoys almost(...)

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Pump slump good for government

Pump slump good for government

Lower gas prices, more driving mean more revenue

FALLING FUEL PRICES may be wreaking havoc in oil-producing countries, but they are bringing smiles to drivers in Massachusetts and helping state and local officials keep their budgets in balance. The price of gasoline has dropped by nearly half since mid-2012, when the average retail price hovered around $3.59 a gallon. By March of this(...)

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About that hot dog

About that hot dog

A rundown of the magazine's highlights

Thomas Farragher at the Boston Globe wrote a column recently about the struggle between hospital haves and have-nots. He likened struggling community hospitals such as Holyoke Medical Center to a push-cart vendor who sets the price of his hot dogs at 60 cents apiece even though they cost $1 to produce. Meanwhile, Massachusetts General and(...)

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Public schools extend their reach

Public schools extend their reach

School systems across Massachusetts are boosting their revenue by taking in students from as far away as China

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS AROUND the state, faced with rising costs and stagnant budgets, are turning outside their districts —even outside the country—to attract tuition money from foreign students and students from other communities inside Massachusetts. The money falls into three pots. According to fiscal 2014 figures from the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 21 public(...)

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Waiting his turn

Waiting his turn

Richie Neal, a centrist Democrat from Massachusetts and a master of the inside, bides his time at Ways and Means

PAUL RYAN’S ASCENSION to the House speaker’s chair in October meant some reshuffling at the Ways and Means committee he was leaving behind, a panel with jurisdiction over taxes, trade, Social Security, Medicare, and welfare. The GOP picked Texan Kevin Brady to move up, as Rep. Richard Neal and his fellow Democrats looked on. For(...)

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Big Three dynamics

Big Three dynamics

How long will they remain ‘one happy family?’

JUST BEFORE THE HOLIDAYS kicked into high gear, the Big Three—Gov. Charlie Baker, House Speaker Robert DeLeo, and Senate President Stanley Rosenberg—sat down for a joint interview with the State House News Service. They said almost nothing of substance in the interview, but the fact that they were all sitting together talking about each other(...)

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