Voices

Governor Fix-It’s fix-it man

Governor Fix-It’s fix-it man

Steve Kadish is the guy in charge of delivering on Charlie Baker’s vow to make state government work

Photographs by Frank Curran STEVE KADISH IS up most days before 5 a.m. After making coffee for himself and his wife and packing lunches for each of them, he sends his first email by 5:30, one of dozens that will go out in a day checking on progress addressing a problem in state government. When(...)

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Grid in the balance

Grid in the balance

Clean, reliable, competitively priced power — or suboptimal solutions?

ON THE FACE of it, New England’s power system is in good shape. Over nearly two decades, the region’s competitive wholesale electricity markets have attracted investment in the power plants and demand-side resources needed to meet consumer demand. Upgrades to the region’s high-voltage transmission system have vastly improved reliability, allowing power to move freely around the(...)

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Dump the millionaire tax

Dump the millionaire tax

Proposed constitutional amendment doesn’t accomplish its stated goals

FORTY-THREE STATES IN this country tax the income of their citizens in some form. Of the states that tax wages, only eight, including Massachusetts, use a single rate rather than a graduated rate. That century-old policy is the main reason why in 2018 the Commonwealth’s voters will likely face a ballot question seeking to impose a(...)

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A call to action

A call to action

Tanisha Sullivan, the new president of the Boston NAACP, thinks the city can ‘get it right’ on race issues

Photograph by Frank Curran What’s at the top of your agenda as you prepare to take over as the new president of the Boston NAACP? It really is a continuation of the work that the NAACP historically has done. There are five key areas that I would say we will continue to focus on: criminal(...)

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Lessons from Singapore 

Lessons from Singapore 

Known for its high-achieving schools, the nation offers Massachusetts a vision for 21st century teaching and learning

ON DECEMBER 6, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) released the results of the 2015 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), an assessment administered in 72 nations every three years that measures 15-year-old students’ skills in reading, mathematics, and science literacy. Massachusetts students did very well and placed toward the top of the(...)

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Turning around New Bedford

Turning around New Bedford

Mayor Jon Mitchell’s game plan for his Gateway City

Photographs by Frank Curran JON MITCHELL WALKS a fine line as the mayor of New Bedford. On the one hand, he is the self-professed squeaky wheel, constantly pressing state and federal officials for more money, whether it’s for dredging the harbor, building a rail link to Boston, or replacing the ancient bridge that connects New(...)

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Youth movement

Youth movement

At 22, Solomon Goldstein-Rose is poised to claim a House seat

Photograph by Frank Curran THE SCENE: The Amherst town cemetery, sitting on a stone wall circling an old burial plot, not far from Emily Dickinson’s grave. Solomon Goldstein-Rose, who won the Democratic primary for an open Amherst-based House seat and faces no opposition in November, suggested the graveyard over a busy bagel shop because his(...)

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Charter showdown

Charter showdown

A charter school leader and teachers union president debate the ballot question

IN NOVEMBER, MASSACHUSETTS voters will have their say on a ballot question that would allow up to 12 new or expanded charter schools each year above the existing state cap on the independently-run, but publicly-funded, schools. The issue has inflamed passions on both sides. We asked two prominent Boston education leaders, Jon Clark, co-director of(...)

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The missing piece of education reform

The missing piece of education reform

Leadership by superintendents and principals is key

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS ago a broad coalition of legislators, business people, education experts, and state officials put together and passed a wide-reaching education reform law. That law reflects a set of shared beliefs—basically, that a combination of increased funding, state testing tied to graduation requirements, new state curriculum frameworks, charter schools, and increased authority for superintendents(...)

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