Jack Sullivan

Senior Investigative Reporter, CommonWealth

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan is a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for nearly three decades. Prior to joining CommonWealth, he was editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. As the Ledger editorial page editor, he won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan is a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for nearly three decades. Prior to joining CommonWealth, he was editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. As the Ledger editorial page editor, he won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

Stories by Jack Sullivan

T overhauls fares for $723 million

T overhauls fares for $723 million

Officials unveil next gen pay system to reduce trip times, increase revenue collection

MBTA OFFICIALS WILL unveil the next generation of fare payment and collection which they say will reduce waits, increase efficiency, minimize the need for cash, and let riders use their own credit cards and cell phones to board trains and buses, all at a cost of more than $723 million over the next 13 years.(...)

Read More »

T taps low bidder for Green Line extension

T taps low bidder for Green Line extension

Price to restart project comes in $237 million below estimate

THE MBTA CHOSE a joint venture led by a Dallas-area contractor that said it would build the long-delayed seven-stop Green Line extension into Somerville and Medford for hundreds of millions less than officials estimated. The winning bid by GLX Constructors, a group of four construction and engineering firms led by Fluor of Irving, Texas, was(...)

Read More »

Rosenberg: We’re not done with pot

Rosenberg: We’re not done with pot

Senate president says Legislature could make more changes to marijuana law

SENATE PRESIDENT STANLEY ROSENBERG said the recreational marijuana law will continue to evolve and he foresees the Legislature making several changes a year. “We created a joint standing committee because we know additional questions are going to come back to us over time and we know that because that’s what happened in Colorado,” Rosenberg said(...)

Read More »

Pot board wants $5 million more

Pot board wants $5 million more

‘No fluff’ budget for FY18 is $7.5 million, lower than projected

THE STATE’S CANNABIS Control Commission has asked lawmakers for another $5.2 million for the remainder of the fiscal year on top of the $2.3 million that was already set aside to get the regulatory structure for legal marijuana up and running in time for the launch target of July 1 for retail pot shops to(...)

Read More »

Three from the T

Three from the T

Blue Line in line for upgrade and other notes from MBTA board meeting

THE BLUE LINE is the poor neglected cousin of the MBTA’s system and many think that needs to change, Amazon or no Amazon. Jeffrey Gonneville, the T’s chief operating officer, told members of the Fiscal and Management Control Board that the line is the system’s “most consistent and reliable line” with some room to grow,(...)

Read More »

T budget deficit up

T budget deficit up

Fewer fares from disgruntled riders part of growing gap

MBTA OFFICIALS ARE eyeing a nearly 67 percent spike in the agency’s projected structural deficit, a hole caused by lower fare revenues from people avoiding what they view as the unreliable service and continued cost overruns by the agency’s paratransit service despite privatization. Michael Abramo, the T’s chief administrator, told members of the Fiscal and(...)

Read More »

Late night T proves costly

Late night T proves costly

Subsidy per rider is 10 times regular bus service

MBTA OFFICIALS MOVED a step closer to approving a pilot late night bus service to launch next summer, running from Mattapan to Revere, but members of the Fiscal and Management Control Board expressed serious reservations about the estimated subsidy for each trip, which would be nearly 10 times what the agency pays for a normal(...)

Read More »

Amazon vs. marijuana

Amazon vs. marijuana

Communities throw millions at retail giant while snubbing pot

WHEN A CHICOPEE woman won the record-setting Powerball jackpot in August, lost in the cacophony were the two $1 million winning tickets sold in Dorchester and Watertown. Despite the disappointment of not hitting the big one, neither winner said “no, thanks” to the lesser sums. But that appears to be what’s happening in Massachusetts with(...)

Read More »

New pot czar is known quantity

New pot czar is known quantity

Assistant treasurer tapped as executive director for marijuana commission

A TOP AIDE to state Treasurer Deborah Goldberg who fashioned the regulatory infrastructure for the nascent retail marijuana business when that office was set to oversee the emerging industry has been tapped as the state’s executive director of the new commission in charge of legal pot. Assistant Treasurer Shawn Collins, 31, was unanimously approved by(...)

Read More »

Islanders want their pot, too

Islanders want their pot, too

Residents urge state commissioners to help them navigate federal obstacles

THE “LISTENING TOUR” by the board charged with regulating the state’s emerging marijuana industry landed on Martha’s Vineyard Tuesday, where the two members heard pleas from pro-pot advocates to help their island as well as Nantucket steer clear of the federal obstacles no other communities in Massachusetts face. About 70 people crowded into the West(...)

Read More »