Sarah Betancourt

Reporter, CommonWealth

About Sarah Betancourt

Sarah Betancourt is a bilingual journalist reporting across New England. Prior to joining Commonwealth, Sarah was a reporter for The Associated Press in Boston, and a correspondent with The Boston Globe and The Guardian. She has written about immigration, social justice, and health policy for outlets like NBC, The Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism, and the New York Law Journal. Sarah has reported stories such as a national look at teacher shortages, how databases are used by police departments to procure information on immigrants, and uncovered the spread of an infectious disease in children at a family detention center. She has covered the State House, local and national politics, crime and general assignment.

Sarah received a 2018 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for her role in the ProPublica/NPR story, “They Got Hurt at Work and Then They Got Deported,” which explored how Florida employers and insurance companies were getting out of paying workers compensation benefits by using a state law to ensure injured undocumented workers were arrested or deported. Sarah attended Emerson College for a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Communication, and Columbia University for a fellowship and Master’s degree with the Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism.

About Sarah Betancourt

Sarah Betancourt is a bilingual journalist reporting across New England. Prior to joining Commonwealth, Sarah was a reporter for The Associated Press in Boston, and a correspondent with The Boston Globe and The Guardian. She has written about immigration, social justice, and health policy for outlets like NBC, The Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism, and the New York Law Journal. Sarah has reported stories such as a national look at teacher shortages, how databases are used by police departments to procure information on immigrants, and uncovered the spread of an infectious disease in children at a family detention center. She has covered the State House, local and national politics, crime and general assignment.

Sarah received a 2018 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for her role in the ProPublica/NPR story, “They Got Hurt at Work and Then They Got Deported,” which explored how Florida employers and insurance companies were getting out of paying workers compensation benefits by using a state law to ensure injured undocumented workers were arrested or deported. Sarah attended Emerson College for a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Communication, and Columbia University for a fellowship and Master’s degree with the Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism.

Stories by Sarah Betancourt

As Massachusetts reopens, prisoners remain isolated

Suicide at Walpole facility raises questions about time alone

Two Boston nonprofits merging

Jewish Vocational Service absorbing Boston Center for Adult Education

Who should pay for the masks?

School districts worry about cost of personal protective equipment

New bill would extend eviction moratorium by a year

Housing court is estimating 20,000 filings when current ban lifts

Baker pushes $35m more for economic recovery package

Bill also includes governor’s housing, zoning proposals

Baker stops short on key reform measure

Wouldn’t require health care background for Soldiers’ Home chief

COVID-19 crackdown coming for N. End restaurants

Whistleblowers demand social distancing, face coverings

Boston City Council bans use of facial recognition tech

Joins 5 other Mass. communities in prohibiting police use

What went wrong at Holyoke Soldiers’ Home

A series of decisions that resulted in a catastrophe

Trump suspends visa program bringing workers to US

Ban affects seasonal employees on Cape, high-tech staff

Another step: Indoor dining resumes Monday

Nail salons, fitting rooms to reopen; office capacity to increase

Barr visit with Gross stirs outcry

AG surprise appearance in Boston draws fire

Supreme Court blocks Trump’s DACA shutdown

Ruling calls president’s actions ‘arbitrary and capricious’

Baker releases plan to decertify police for misconduct

Bill would standardize training, give public access to info on officers

Brazilian-American makes history on Beacon Hill

Sena, a former DACA recipient, is now a state lawmaker

Local police departments adopting 8 Can’t Wait

Backers say measures could reduce police violence

COVID-19 sends food assistance demand soaring

Baker launches $36m program to bolster supply chain

Big 3 on board for policing, racism legislation

Baker says he is not in favor of defunding law enforcement

Beheading of Columbus statue prompts discussion

Walsh putting six-foot figure in storage for now

Report: Undocumented immigrants at risk of losing work, pay

Policy center says lack of benefits leaves workers in peril 

Holmes, Idowu outline reform steps

Both push equity, Idowu backs police defunding

Businesses like new PPP rules

Law extends loan terms, allows more money to go for rent

Healey seeks more power to investigate police misconduct

Joins 17 other AGs in letter seeking congressional action

Federal immigration office reopens

7,000 residents waiting to take citizenship oath

Officials of color unveil 10-point plan

Arroyo emotionally recounts stop by police in Providence

SJC refuses to order release of convicted prisoners

Says DOC’s policies do not constitute deliberate indifference