Economy

EF grows on backs of cheap labor

EF grows on backs of cheap labor

Cambridge-based au pair agency reaps benefits for doing good while acting bad

A CAMBRIDGE COMPANY, Education First, is a big winner in the race for state business tax credits. The privately owned Swedish company now occupies two buildings (and, thanks to its tax credit, will soon occupy three) in the city’s redeveloped NorthPoint area abutting Charlestown and East Somerville. Of the $15 million in economic development incentive(...)

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A clash of housing visions

A clash of housing visions

Pro-growth ‘YIMBY’ conference arrives in Boston, faces pushback from tenant activists

SEVERAL HUNDRED ADVOCATES from across the country are descending on Roxbury Community College beginning Friday for a conference committed to the idea of building more housing to relieve a crunch that is pricing people out of booming coastal cities like Boston. The YIMBYtown convention is the national ingathering of a new movement – this is(...)

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James Fallows and Jimmy Carter

Author's book draw on virtues of a president he served -- and slammed

JAMES FALLOWS WAS President Jimmy Carter’s chief speechwriter in the 1970s. Two generations before him, FDR’s advisor and speechwriter Samuel Rosenman (who coined the term “New Deal”) declared that aides to a president should serve with a “passion for anonymity.” Fallows helped to break that mold, leaving the White House to become a public critic(...)

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Civic grit

Civic grit

Reasons to be hopeful about America’s future, from unlikely places off the beaten path

BOOK REVIEW — Our Towns: A 100,000-Mile Journey into the Heart of America, by James Fallows and Deborah Fallows (Pantheon Books, 413 pages) PEOPLE WHO LIVE in cosmopolitan Boston and only venture beyond the metropolis to visit the Cape in summer or ski in the north in winter might assume that nothing much of interest(...)

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A new Quincy

A new Quincy

Building boom looks to move city beyond its past without leaving it behind

QUINCY MAYOR THOMAS KOCH calls the MBTA’s Red Line the “spine” of his aging city. With four stops in North Quincy, Wollaston, Quincy Center, and Quincy Adams, the T’s Red Line allows residents to move around the city and connect with Boston, Cambridge, and Somerville to the north. These transit connections have long been the(...)

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Think tank sees peril in Boston luxury towers

Think tank sees peril in Boston luxury towers

Backs new taxes on units, fuller disclosure of owners

A NEW REPORT from a Washington-based liberal think tank raises concerns about the proliferation of luxury condominiums in Boston and urges policymakers to identify who all the new owners are and impose new taxes on them. The administration of Boston Mayor Marty Walsh has largely welcomed the jobs and investment associated with the luxury construction.(...)

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It’s Woo everything in Worcester

It’s Woo everything in Worcester

Lucchino may not be convinced, but now there’s Woo Ha Ha!

At the press conference last month announcing the Pawsox would be moving to Worcester, the team’s chairman, Larry Lucchino, didn’t sound like he was a fan of WooSox as the club’s new nickname. Even though Minor League Baseball trademarked WooSox, Lucchino insisted the club’s name hadn’t been decided yet. When someone in the crowd shouted(...)

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It’s Woo everything in Worcester

At the press conference last month announcing the Pawsox would be moving to Worcester, the team’s chairman, Larry Lucchino, didn’t sound like he was a fan of WooSox as the club’s new nickname. Even though Minor League Baseball trademarked WooSox, Lucchino insisted the club’s name hadn’t been decided yet. When someone in the crowd shouted(...)

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Draft lease sheds light on Kraft soccer plans

Draft lease sheds light on Kraft soccer plans

Dorchester deal included new stadium, mitigation, rent

BOB KRAFT DIDN’T ASK for any government subsidies when he sought to build a soccer stadium on the former site of the Bayside Exposition Center in Dorchester’s Columbia Point neighborhood in 2017.  The deal ultimately fell apart due to neighborhood opposition and an inability to negotiate the purchase of an adjacent land parcel. Kraft issued a(...)

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Hey, college presidents, speak up!

Hey, college presidents, speak up!

University heads protect their coffers by avoiding big issues

COLLEGE PRESIDENTS HAVE long used the bully pulpit that comes with their office to shape public opinion. That is, until now. Today, college leaders remain silent, having turned their sights inward to their own campuses. Their desire to avoid any press has diminished their moral authority and role as important thought leaders. In the past,(...)

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