Time to get to work

the big dig was touted as saving time and money for commuters, but the most recent Census data show travel time to work for most cities and towns around Boston stayed the same or increased since 2000.

According to US Census five-year community surveys, which have taken the place of the long-form census questionnaire, Cohasset residents have the longest commute in the state with an estimated average time of 39-plus minutes to get to the office. Ten years ago it took Cohasset workers nearly five minutes less to get to work.

Statewide, the estimated average commute time is slightly more than 27 minutes, up about six seconds from 2000. The national average is just over 25 minutes, which dropped about 1 percent from 2000.
Not everyone, of course, works in Boston, where the Big Dig was dug, but one might expect those in the surrounding cities and towns to see some reduction in their commuting time.

Quincy residents, however, have the same length of commute—a little more than 31 minutes—as they did in 2000. To the north, the trend is the same. Saugus commuters are taking a little more time to get to work, with average commuting time going up 1.5 percent from 2000 to nearly 27 minutes today. Lynn and Beverly, meanwhile, stayed the same over the last decade, 27 minutes and 25½ minutes, respectively.

Meet the Author

Jack Sullivan

Senior Investigative Reporter, CommonWealth

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan is a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for nearly three decades. Prior to joining CommonWealth, he was editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. As the Ledger editorial page editor, he won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

About Jack Sullivan

Jack Sullivan is a veteran of the Boston newspaper scene for nearly three decades. Prior to joining CommonWealth, he was editorial page editor of The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, a part of the GateHouse Media chain. Prior to that he was news editor at another GateHouse paper, The Enterprise of Brockton, and also was city edition editor at the Ledger. Jack was an investigative and enterprise reporter and executive city editor at the Boston Herald and a reporter at The Boston Globe.

He has reported stories such as the federal investigation into the Teamsters, the workings of the Yawkey Trust and sale of the Red Sox, organized crime, the church sex abuse scandal and the September 11 terrorist attacks. He has covered the State House, state and local politics, K-16 education, courts, crime, and general assignment.

Jack received the New England Press Association award for investigative reporting for a series on unused properties owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, and shared the association's award for business for his reporting on the sale of the Boston Red Sox. As the Ledger editorial page editor, he won second place in 2007 for editorial writing from the Inland Press Association, the nation's oldest national journalism association of nearly 900 newspapers as members.

At CommonWealth, Jack and editor Bruce Mohl won first place for In-Depth Reporting from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors for a look at special education funding in Massachusetts. The same organization also awarded first place to a unique collaboration between WFXT-TV (FOX25) and CommonWealth for a series of stories on the Boston Redevelopment Authority and city employees getting affordable housing units, written by Jack and Bruce.

A Boston native, Jack has lived in Massachusetts all his life. He was a major in English and history with a minor in political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. A father and grandfather, he lives in Plymouth with his wife, Susan.

Meet the Author
The commute for Wellesley workers rose about a minute from just over 24 minutes to a little more than 25, but, interestingly, more people abandoned their cars and bought new walking shoes. Nearly 18 percent of people from Wellesley walk to work compared with less than 12 percent in 2000.

If a short commute is what you seek, look offshore. Residents in Nantucket have the easiest daily commute to work in Massachusetts, with an estimated average of 11 minutes to get there. In addition, islanders are much more likely to carpool, with 16.2 percent sharing a ride, nearly twice the statewide average.

HC