2 senators say proposed building code comes up short

Urge Baker to allow communities to ban new fossil-fuel infrastructure

STATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE

AS THE DEPARTMENT of Energy Resources launches hearings on its straw proposal for a stretch code update and a new municipal opt-in specialized stretch code, two key senators made clear to Commissioner Patrick Woodcock that they expect “substantial revisions” to the proposals before they take effect later this year.

Sens. Michael Barrett and Cynthia Creem, the chairs of the Telecommunications, Utilities and Energy Committee and Senate Committee on Global Warming, told Woodcock in a letter released Tuesday that the suite of state code changes the administration hopes will encourage builders to shift from fossil fuel heating in favor of electrification “comes up short” and took issue with the way DOER scheduled the five statutorily required public hearings.

“The straw proposal bars a city or town from mandating all-electric new construction, even after local officials allow for vigorous analysis and debate. For municipalities in Massachusetts and other progressive states, all-electric construction is the favored strategy for decarbonizing new buildings. Barring communities from employing it would be a significant setback,” the senators said. They added, “Bottom line: Despite its unequivocal support of ‘net zero emissions’ by 2050, despite the special challenges of reducing emissions in buildings, and despite having been given a full 18 months by the Legislature to do its work, the Baker administration has proposed a municipal opt-in specialized stretch energy code that comes up short.”

Updating the existing stretch code and creating a new net-zero specialized stretch code for cities and towns to adopt is one step lawmakers required in last year’s climate roadmap law to move Massachusetts towards net-zero emissions by the middle of the century. The law requires the new net-zero code be in place by the end of 2022.

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Barrett said he plans to testify Thursday morning alongside municipal officials at the second of five hearings DOER is holding between Wednesday evening and next Tuesday afternoon. The five towns to be represented — Lexington, Concord, Brookline, Arlington and Acton — “are seeking legislative authority to go further than the DOER draft would otherwise allow,” Barrett’s office said.

Barrett and Creem said that by scheduling the hearings the way DOER did, including a Friday evening hearing specific to environmental justice communities, “the Baker Administration is depriving the public of a full opportunity to participate.”