Encore pulls in $16.7 million during opening week

Everett casino spins off $4.2 million in tax revenue

ENCORE BOSTON HARBOR’S opening week brought in more than $16.7 million. The Massachusetts Gaming Commission reported the figure as part of its June revenue report for its three licensed gambling facilities: Plainridge Park Casino, MGM Springfield, and now Encore Boston Harbor.  

Encore brought in $7.7 million for table games and $9.1 million for slot machines. The venue is subject to a 25 percent state tax on gaming revenue, which brought in about $4.2 million during its one week of operations in June. 

The Everett casino, which opened on June 23, raked in during its first week only about $800,000 less than MGM Springfield did for the entire month 

The state has collected $387 million in total taxes and assessments from all three gaming venues since their respective openings. In June alone, the three generated approximately $50 million in gross gaming revenue, spinning off $15.8 million in taxes 

Large percentages of the tax money go to the state’s education and rainy day funds, transportation infrastructure, and local aid. The Massachusetts Cultural Council, Massachusetts Tourism Funds and others get a smaller chunk.  

The Wynn Resorts casino, with an estimated price tag of $2.6 billion, opened last month to much fanfareEncore did not release statistics for its total number of visits so far, but had predicted roughly 50,000 visitors would attend its opening day. The company plans to eventually employee up to 5,800 people at the casino. 

The company’s plans almost came to a halt after the Wall Street Journal published an expose about sexual misconduct allegations against Steve Wynn, then the company’s chairman and CEO. Wynn resigned, and Wynn Resorts eventually paid the Gaming Commission a fine of $35 million as a condition of securing its license 

The new casino along the Mystic River features over 670 hotel rooms, 15 dining venues, and, among other bells and whistles, a $28 million-dollar statue of Popeye (which is for sale).  

Meet the Author

Sarah Betancourt

Reporter, CommonWealth magazine

About Sarah Betancourt

Sarah Betancourt is a bilingual journalist reporting across New England. Prior to joining Commonwealth, Sarah was a reporter for The Associated Press in Boston, and a correspondent with The Boston Globe and The Guardian. She has written about immigration, social justice, and health policy for outlets like NBC, The Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism, and the New York Law Journal. Sarah has reported stories such as a national look at teacher shortages, how databases are used by police departments to procure information on immigrants, and uncovered the spread of an infectious disease in children at a family detention center. She has covered the State House, local and national politics, crime and general assignment.

Sarah received a 2018 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for her role in the ProPublica/NPR story, “They Got Hurt at Work and Then They Got Deported,” which explored how Florida employers and insurance companies were getting out of paying workers compensation benefits by using a state law to ensure injured undocumented workers were arrested or deported. Sarah attended Emerson College for a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Communication, and Columbia University for a fellowship and Master’s degree with the Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism.

About Sarah Betancourt

Sarah Betancourt is a bilingual journalist reporting across New England. Prior to joining Commonwealth, Sarah was a reporter for The Associated Press in Boston, and a correspondent with The Boston Globe and The Guardian. She has written about immigration, social justice, and health policy for outlets like NBC, The Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism, and the New York Law Journal. Sarah has reported stories such as a national look at teacher shortages, how databases are used by police departments to procure information on immigrants, and uncovered the spread of an infectious disease in children at a family detention center. She has covered the State House, local and national politics, crime and general assignment.

Sarah received a 2018 Investigative Reporters and Editors Award for her role in the ProPublica/NPR story, “They Got Hurt at Work and Then They Got Deported,” which explored how Florida employers and insurance companies were getting out of paying workers compensation benefits by using a state law to ensure injured undocumented workers were arrested or deported. Sarah attended Emerson College for a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Communication, and Columbia University for a fellowship and Master’s degree with the Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism.

June also marked MGM Springfield’s 10th month of operation since its opening late August 2018. The Springfield casino had over ten percent less revenue this month than when it launched.

Encore Boston Harbor’s spokeswoman said that as a publicly traded company, Wynn Resorts will comment on the results reported by the Massachusetts Gaming Commission during quarterly earnings calls.