Gomez leaves GOP, eyes independent bid against Warren 

Move keeps options open; more challengers would likely benefit incumbent 

GABRIEL GOMEZ, who ran unsuccessfully for the US Senate as a Republican in 2013, has switched his party affiliation to independent and is not ruling out a run against Sen. Elizabeth Warren this year, according to a source familiar with his thinking.

Gomez said on WCVB’s On The Record this weekend that he had switched his voter registration from Republican to independent, which voter records confirm. He said it was now “impossible” for him to support the Republican Party at the national level. Gomez previously ran against Ed Markey in a special election for John Kerry’s Senate seat in 2013, losing by 10 points. Markey will be up for reelection in 2020, which would mark another opportunity for Gomez to make a run, should be decide to pass on running this cycle.

Gomez has sharply criticized both Trump and members of his former party who have not stood up to the president. Here he is responding to a column about Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse:

 

Gomez also called on Republicans to reject Roy Moore in last month’s Alabama Senate race, and criticized Trump’s “draft dodging deferments,” calling him a coward, and a “not tough guy.” He also opposed the GOP’s tax legislation.

If he runs an an independent this year, Gomez would sidestep a crowded Republican primary and convention. Building enough delegates to clear the 15 percent threshold necessary to move forward would have been difficult starting at this late hour. State Rep. Geoff Diehl, businessman John Kingston, and former state GOP executive director Beth Lindstrom are all running for the Republican nomination and will be vying for delegates. Self-proclaimed inventor of email Shiva Ayyadurai dropped out the Republican race to run as an independent.

Meet the Author

Steve Koczela

President, MassINC Polling Group

About Steve Koczela

Steve Koczela is the President of The MassINC Polling Group, where he has grown the organization from its infancy to a nationally known and respected polling provider. During the 2014 election cycle, MPG conducted election polling for WBUR, the continuation of a three-year partnership. Koczela again led the endeavor, producing polls which came within one point of the margin in both the Massachusetts gubernatorial and U.S. Senate Elections. He was also lead writer for Poll Vault, WBUR’s political reporting section during the 2014 Election Cycle.

He has led survey research programs for the U.S. Department of State in Iraq, in key states for President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign, and has conducted surveys and polls on behalf of many private corporations. Koczela brings a deep understanding of the foundations of public opinion and a wide ranging methodological expertise. He earned U.S. Department of State recognition for his leading edge work on sample evaluation in post conflict areas using geospatial systems.

Koczela is frequent guest on WBUR as well as many other news and talk programs in Massachusetts and elsewhere. His polling analysis is often cited in local, state, and national media outlets. He currently serves as President of the New England Chapter of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (NEAAPOR). Koczela holds a Master’s degree in Marketing Research from the University of Wisconsin and is a veteran of the war in Iraq.

About Steve Koczela

Steve Koczela is the President of The MassINC Polling Group, where he has grown the organization from its infancy to a nationally known and respected polling provider. During the 2014 election cycle, MPG conducted election polling for WBUR, the continuation of a three-year partnership. Koczela again led the endeavor, producing polls which came within one point of the margin in both the Massachusetts gubernatorial and U.S. Senate Elections. He was also lead writer for Poll Vault, WBUR’s political reporting section during the 2014 Election Cycle.

He has led survey research programs for the U.S. Department of State in Iraq, in key states for President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign, and has conducted surveys and polls on behalf of many private corporations. Koczela brings a deep understanding of the foundations of public opinion and a wide ranging methodological expertise. He earned U.S. Department of State recognition for his leading edge work on sample evaluation in post conflict areas using geospatial systems.

Koczela is frequent guest on WBUR as well as many other news and talk programs in Massachusetts and elsewhere. His polling analysis is often cited in local, state, and national media outlets. He currently serves as President of the New England Chapter of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (NEAAPOR). Koczela holds a Master’s degree in Marketing Research from the University of Wisconsin and is a veteran of the war in Iraq.

Gabriel Gomez

To run as an independent, Gomez would need to submit 10,000 signatures by late August, meaning he can keep his would-be opponents guessing for months yet. This deadline would mean he would have to file just before the Republican primary in September.

Having a Republican and multiple right-leaning independent challengers could have the effect of making the path to reelection easier for Warren. Warren is popular among Democrats and left-leaning independents, but has never had much appeal across party lines. With Ayyadurai already in as an independent, a Gomez candidacy would mean voters who oppose her could split among the several challengers rather than settling on one.