Lindstrom, Adrien dissect their races

Talk about why they ran and why they lost

Even in a year when women are expected to make strong political gains, there are no guarantees.

Beth Lindstrom, who came in third in the Republican primary for US Senate, and Gerly Adrien, who came in a close second in a Democratic primary for a state rep’s seat from Everett, explain why they ran for office and why they think they lost on CommonWealth’s Codcast, hosted by Democrat Jesse Mermell and Republican Jennifer Nassour.

Lindstrom says she faced both financial and political hurdles in her race against Geoff Diehl and John Kingston. She says she believes Massachusetts Republicans were open to her argument that she would back President Trump when he was right and oppose him when he was wrong, but she lacked enough campaign funds to get that message out.

Even in Massachusetts, she also faced long odds running as a moderate Republican in a GOP primary. She said Diehl, who won the primary with 55 percent of the vote, spent three years building his conservative base by leading the Trump campaign in Massachusetts and by appearing on supportive radio talk shows.

“How does a moderate woman ever get through a Republican primary?” she asked, noting that her views clashed with those in the GOP who are pro-life and Second Amendment absolutists.

Adrien, 29, says she felt like she was running against every politician in Everett, from the mayor on down to members of the school committee, all of whom came out in support of her opponent, incumbent Rep. Joseph McGonagle Jr. “Running against the whole establishment was tough,” she said.

Adrien nevertheless garnered 39 percent of the vote, 2 points behind McGonagle and 20 points ahead of the third candidate in the race, Steve Smith.

Nassour asked the two candidates whether they felt they fell victim to an old boys’ network in their campaigns.

Lindstrom says she didn’t feel as if an old boys’ network stood in her way, while Adrien recalled one instance when she was knocking on doors and was greeted by a woman who knew who she was. When Adrien asked whether she could count on the woman’s vote, the woman called out to her husband who told Adrien that McGonagle was a friend of the family and they would be voting for him.

Meet the Author

Bruce Mohl

Editor, CommonWealth

About Bruce Mohl

Bruce Mohl is the editor of CommonWealth magazine. Bruce came to CommonWealth from the Boston Globe, where he spent nearly 30 years in a wide variety of positions covering business and politics. He covered the Massachusetts State House and served as the Globe’s State House bureau chief in the late 1980s. He also reported for the Globe’s Spotlight Team, winning a Loeb award in 1992 for coverage of conflicts of interest in the state’s pension system. He served as the Globe’s political editor in 1994 and went on to cover consumer issues for the newspaper. At CommonWealth, Bruce helped launch the magazine’s website and has written about a wide range of issues with a special focus on politics, tax policy, energy, and gambling. Bruce is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Dorchester.

About Bruce Mohl

Bruce Mohl is the editor of CommonWealth magazine. Bruce came to CommonWealth from the Boston Globe, where he spent nearly 30 years in a wide variety of positions covering business and politics. He covered the Massachusetts State House and served as the Globe’s State House bureau chief in the late 1980s. He also reported for the Globe’s Spotlight Team, winning a Loeb award in 1992 for coverage of conflicts of interest in the state’s pension system. He served as the Globe’s political editor in 1994 and went on to cover consumer issues for the newspaper. At CommonWealth, Bruce helped launch the magazine’s website and has written about a wide range of issues with a special focus on politics, tax policy, energy, and gambling. Bruce is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Dorchester.

“We’re still in that time,” Adrien said. “Her husband still spoke for her.”

BRUCE MOHL