Lyons has votes to remain Mass. GOP chair

Baker forces fail to elect enough supporters

THE MASSACHUSETTS GOP released unofficial results on Friday indicating conservative Jim Lyons should have enough support on the 80-member state committee to continue as chairman of the state Republican Party.

The state committee races were unusually contentious and bitter this year, with undisclosed amounts of money pouring in to the campaigns. Forces allied with Gov. Charlie Baker sought to elect candidates who would be supportive of his agenda, while more conservative elements in the party rallied behind Lyons. There was also a sharp split between fans of President Trump (Lyons) and Trump opponents (Baker).

A group supporting Lyons used robocalls from Boston Herald columnist Howie Carr to steer potential voters to a website (votereform.org) where they could sidestep the lies of the “Baker-Weld swamp” and find the names of the “true reformers” in the party.

Jim Lyons, chair of the Massachusetts Republican Party

Based on that candidate list, 47 supporters of Lyons were elected on Tuesday, the same number that elected him chairman of the party in 2019. Another seat is still in play, with the party awaiting the results of a write-in campaign by Rachel Kemp, a Lyons supporter.

Evan Lips, a spokesman for the Massachusetts GOP, said he had no final tally of Lyons supporters elected to the state committee. He also noted that official results won’t be released by the secretary of state’s office until next week.

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Bruce Mohl

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About Bruce Mohl

Bruce Mohl is the editor of CommonWealth magazine. Bruce came to CommonWealth from the Boston Globe, where he spent nearly 30 years in a wide variety of positions covering business and politics. He covered the Massachusetts State House and served as the Globe’s State House bureau chief in the late 1980s. He also reported for the Globe’s Spotlight Team, winning a Loeb award in 1992 for coverage of conflicts of interest in the state’s pension system. He served as the Globe’s political editor in 1994 and went on to cover consumer issues for the newspaper. At CommonWealth, Bruce helped launch the magazine’s website and has written about a wide range of issues with a special focus on politics, tax policy, energy, and gambling. Bruce is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Dorchester.

About Bruce Mohl

Bruce Mohl is the editor of CommonWealth magazine. Bruce came to CommonWealth from the Boston Globe, where he spent nearly 30 years in a wide variety of positions covering business and politics. He covered the Massachusetts State House and served as the Globe’s State House bureau chief in the late 1980s. He also reported for the Globe’s Spotlight Team, winning a Loeb award in 1992 for coverage of conflicts of interest in the state’s pension system. He served as the Globe’s political editor in 1994 and went on to cover consumer issues for the newspaper. At CommonWealth, Bruce helped launch the magazine’s website and has written about a wide range of issues with a special focus on politics, tax policy, energy, and gambling. Bruce is a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Dorchester.

But Lips indicated Lyons feels he is very secure in his position. “Jim was very pleased with the other night’s results,” he said.

Republicans, who account for only 10 percent of registered voters, are now trying to unite in the wake of a campaign that split them apart badly. Officials said the mending of fences will take time.