Wu says she’s won a spot in Boston mayoral final 

Councilor ‘confident’ she’s one of top 2

WITH OFFICIAL RESULTS slow to trickle in, City Councilor Michelle Wu told supporters Tuesday night she is confident she’ll finish in one of the two top spots in Boston’s preliminary mayoral election and secure a place on the ballot for the November final election. 

“We are confident we made the top two and are moving on to the final,” Wu said at her election night party at a Roslindale brewery. 

Wu has led the polling throughout the race to replace Marty Walsh, who resigned in March to become labor secretary in President Biden’s cabinet.

Three fellow city councilors — Andrea Campbell, Annissa Essaibi George, and Kim Janey, who became acting mayor when Walsh left — have been tightly bunched in recent polls for second place. The top two finishers in the preliminary election advance to the final election on November 2.

Essaibi George’s campaign was expressing optimism that she would finish second, but she had not made any announcement as of 11 pm. 

The fifth major candidate in the race, former city economic development chief John Barros, has lagged behind in polling. 

State election officials explained that returns were delayed in coming in because of the need to check late votes put in “drop boxes” against voter rolls to make sure there were no duplicate votes. As of 11 pm, Boston election department website had posted no returns.

Meet the Author

Michael Jonas

Executive Editor, CommonWealth

About Michael Jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in journalism in Massachusetts since the early 1980s. Before joining the CommonWealth staff in early 2001, he was a contributing writer for the magazine for two years. His cover story in CommonWealth's Fall 1999 issue on Boston youth outreach workers was selected for a PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency.

Michael got his start in journalism at the Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston's largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the Boston Sunday Globe's City Weekly section.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989, he was a co-producer for "The AIDS Quarterly," a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s, he worked as a producer for "Our Times," a weekly magazine program on WHDH-TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

About Michael Jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in journalism in Massachusetts since the early 1980s. Before joining the CommonWealth staff in early 2001, he was a contributing writer for the magazine for two years. His cover story in CommonWealth's Fall 1999 issue on Boston youth outreach workers was selected for a PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) Award from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency.

Michael got his start in journalism at the Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston's largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the Boston Sunday Globe's City Weekly section.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989, he was a co-producer for "The AIDS Quarterly," a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s, he worked as a producer for "Our Times," a weekly magazine program on WHDH-TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

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