Fall 2000

Fall 2000

Ethically challenged in Randolph

RANDOLPH-The state’s conflict-of-interest law provides little wiggle room for volunteer members of town boards, as two Randolph officials found out this year–the hard way. In June, Philip Nelson, a landscaper who was also a member of the town’s Landscape Review Board, agreed to pay a $1,750 fine to the State Ethics Commission–the biggest fine levied(...)

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Where are they now A quiz

A scavenger hunt for political has-beens Whatever happened to …? That is the question. They were once movers and shakers in the byzantine world of Bay State politics. But now they are off the radar screen. They had clout, savvy, even–some of them–longevity. Today, they value their hard-earned (and well-deserved) obscurity. But CommonWealth tracked them(...)

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Adult educational attainment

Massachusetts residents are among the country’s best educated, but not everyone is prepared for a knowledge-driven world. Bay State adults rank fourth in college education, with 31 percent holding a bachelor’s degree or higher. But for those holding a high school diploma, the state falls to 18th, with nearly 15 percent of adults lacking that(...)

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Its easier to manage care than expectations

The principal challenge to scientific medicine is no longer discovering new cures but affording new discoveries. Modern medicine represents an awesome, ever-expanding repertoire of life-saving and life-enhancing diagnostic, surgical, and pharmacological inventions. American medicine is quite literally the envy of the world. In the 20th century, it has contributed to a doubling of life expectancy(...)

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How to avoid sentencing scandals

The furor over Superior Court Judge Maria Lopez’s sentence of Charles Horton to home confinement and probation for abducting a child and sexually assaulting him at the point of a screwdriver has, as usual in allegations of judicial “softness” on criminals, veered off in the wrong direction. Calls for the judge’s removal from the bench(...)

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Counterpoint

I am a democrat. A little “d” democrat. I think democracy is a good thing. A clear-eyed, educated, and informed public went to the polls on November 3, 1998 and cast a binding vote to enact the Massachusetts Clean Elections Law by a two-to-one margin. More than one million voters understood the need to overhaul(...)

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Argument

I am proud to be a Democrat. I contribute to other Democrats who run for office. I do not contribute to Republicans as a rule. I don’t contribute to people who have views that are not in line with mine or whom I do not support. However, under the so-called Clean Elections Law, I am(...)

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The vanishing T token

The world of high technology has transformed Massachusetts economically. Could fare collection at the T be the next inroad for electronica? Thanks to an overhaul this year in the way the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is funded, the Boston-area transit agency is making some changes. For one thing, the fares have gone up-the first across-the-board(...)

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Summer school scenes

Like a lot of other students in the Boston public schools this past summer, 15-year-old Christine Dihigo needed a little push. By her own admission, Christine, a self-confident girl with a dramatic flair for reading aloud in class, “didn’t care” about doing well in ninth grade last year at Brighton High School. As a result,(...)

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