Fall 2001

Fall 2001

Gerrymandering is alive and well

Gerrymandering is alive and well

All summer and into the fall, politics junkies have been treated to an unexpected sideshow: a battle of insiders over congressional redistricting. That the redrawing of district lines gives rise to political gamesmanship should surprise no one. The federal census that takes place at the start of every new decade is always followed by a(...)

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Counterpoints

Changes in technology have opened up amazing new frontiers in business and commerce over the past several years. Advances in biotechnology and science are changing the course of our daily lives. But of all the developments we have seen in the past decade, none really compares with the emergence of the Internet. This new technology(...)

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Argument

The Internet revolution is touching all of our lives, giving us exciting new choices, services, and knowledge. Whether it is information, products, or services, chances are you can find it on the Internet, in addition to, or in lieu of, your local newspaper, store, or professional. This new competition is great for consumers and businesses(...)

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Mending the security blanket

“Life is risky. You can decide to, you know, live your life afraid of that happening, or you can decide to live your life the way Americans live their lives, which is unafraid.” So said New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani two weeks after terrorists turned a swath of lower Manhattan into a mass grave and(...)

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Easy being Green

Before he stepped down to become clerk magistrate of Ware District Court in May after nearly 27 years in the State House, Democratic state Rep. William P. Nagle of Northampton hadn’t faced a serious challenger in 20 years. That made his 1st Hampshire District seat seem safe to hand down to his longtime aide, Peter(...)

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Billboards on school buses

Students at the Fenway High School in Boston pound away on keyboards in the CVS Pharmacies Computer Lab and check out books from the Harcourt General Library without giving the “branding” a second thought. In an increasingly commercialized society, corporate labels show up on everything. Sure, the FleetCenter has replaced the Boston Garden. But naming(...)

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NotSo Green Acres

NotSo Green Acres

Every now and then I’ll be talking to my friend Jack, who works in Boston and lives in Newton, and he’ll say: “So, when are you moving back to civilization?” By “civilization,” of course, he means inside the Route 128 ring, where golf courses and cemeteries count as open space. Where buyers actually pay more(...)

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Not Quite What the Doctor Ordered

Not Quite What the Doctor Ordered

When Bernice Speliotis downs the nine pills she takes each day or reaches for the inhaler she relies on to keep her asthma in check, the 72-year-old Lynn resident admits to some doubts about the blessings of retirement. “The golden years–they’re not that golden always,” she says ruefully. But if glaucoma, high blood pressure, and(...)

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Keeping the customers ‘satisficed’

Keeping the customers ‘satisficed’

The barely contested mayoral election is a sign of the political times in Boston. But it's nothing to get excited about

This year’s election campaign for mayor of Boston has hardly revved the city’s engines. But at least somebody is running against Tom Menino. Four years ago, Boston held a mayoral election with only one name on the ballot, an acute embarrassment in a city renowned for its politics. But the 2001 race is barely an(...)

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Small Business Climate

High-tax, high-cost Massachusetts is often portrayed as hostile to the entrepreneurial spirit. But in the new Small Business Survival Index, compiled by a Washington, DC-based advocacy group, the Bay State scores just above the middle of the pack. The index is a quirky sum of measures that severely punishes states like Massachusetts for high personal(...)

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