Fall 2003

Fall 2003

The state Senate goes under the budget knife

The state Senate goes under the budget knife

INTRO TEXT Staking their ground as defenders of an already frayed social safety net, Beacon Hill lawmakers voted over the summer to override hundreds of Gov. Mitt Romney’s budget vetoes, restoring spending for everything from legal assistance programs to school breakfasts. One veto, however, remained untouched by lawmakers, though it was an item near and(...)

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Job disqualifications

Job disqualifications

“My thing was shoplifting for drug money,” Angela Flonory says. “I would just go into stores with a duffel bag, take some sheet sets, lingerie. One time I took a big comforter. Anything I knew I could sell quick, so I could buy crack.” Angela Flonory’s CORI report has cost her three jobs. Flonory, 35,(...)

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Black Power

Black Power

Why are African-Americans still struggling to get ahead in Boston politics?

The ballroom on the top floor of the Parker House hotel in downtown Boston was overflowing, and it seemed that the world of Boston politics was being turned on its head. When the results of the preliminary election for mayor rolled in on a crisp October night in 1983, Mel King, a former state representative(...)

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Lodges and lattes

Lodges and lattes

In our last issue, sociologist Theda Skocpol lamented the decline of fraternal organizations in America (“Civic Dissociation,” CW, Summer 2003), saying that such groups appeal to “people from a wide variety of social backgrounds.” Those organizations are still around in Massachusetts, and among the strongest is the Elks, which has 75 lodges in the Bay(...)

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A timely look at the racial gap in American schools

A timely look at the racial gap in American schools

No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in LearningBy Abigail Thernstrom and Stephan ThernstromSimon & Schuster, New York, 334 pages. This is a useful and timely, though ultimately somewhat disappointing, book by a prominent husband-and-wife team: a member of the Massachusetts Board of Education (and senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute) and a distinguished historian who(...)

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After salvaging the Big Dig Andrew Natsios has a tougher task rebuilding Iraq

After salvaging the Big Dig Andrew Natsios has a tougher task rebuilding Iraq

President George W. Bush’s hopes for re-election are now riding on turning Iraq, a country riven by ethnic and religious factions with no memory of anything but dictatorship, into a stable, thriving democracy. In that daunting task, the president is counting not only on the US military, which has suffered more casualties from guerrilla attacks(...)

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Poetic views of good ideas

Play on Words In a good play on words Ideas seem to just emerge, Fully formed long lyrical lines From the chamber of a brilliant mind. Hah! Don’t believe it my friends! Chaos–thousands, thousands of words, Ideas, theories, notions carom off walls, Tumble off the backs of one another. Some drift lazily like hot-air balloons,(...)

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A 5 raise buys a lot of trouble for Stonehams town moderator

STONEHAM–Five bucks can’t even get you into a movie in most places, but it can still buy a lot of trouble in Stoneham. Moderator Michael Rotondi won an annual pay raise of $5 from town meeting in May, but two months later the voters snatched it back, with some claiming they never realized just how(...)

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What Boston needs to do to capitalize on the Democratic National Convention

What Boston needs to do to capitalize on the Democratic National Convention

Political and civic leaders of smart, effective cities use big public events to achieve long-lasting development and social benefits. That’s what I’ve learned from six years of visits to world-class metropolises in this country and abroad in search of models for civic development. These benefits are achieved because hosting high-profile occasions forces these cities to(...)

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