Fall 2004

Fall 2004

The Hancock Case: Remedy lies in new goals new strategies

We are really just beginning to understand that schools are indeed our most important social institutions. And only recently have we faced up to the reality that, rather than being the great equalizers that mythmakers proclaim, schools have been reflective of the enormous inequalities in American life. The good news is that for the past(...)

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Letters

After reading the article “Being Ron Preston” (Health Care Extra 2004), I was appalled to realize how little the cabinet secretary charged with protecting the health of the Commonwealth understands about public health. He states that public health advocates should work with him to integrate public health into primary care. One might wonder how Ron(...)

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Romney downplays job turnover and jousts with legislators over economic development

Romney downplays job turnover and jousts with legislators over economic development

INTRO TEXT Mitt Romney swept into office with a vow to put his business know-how to work for the Massachusetts economy. Nearly two years after his arrival, however, employment growth remains sluggish, while Romney has faced a job challenge of his own, with the top two members of his economic development team resigning in the(...)

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Municipal governments use college internships to snag future employees

INTRO TEXT In 2002, Michael Young was still a Midwesterner, earning his master’s degree in public administration at the University of Kansas. But in order to graduate, he needed to complete a year-long internship, so he accepted a post as management intern with the town of Lexington, which made him the only person in his(...)

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Whither Worcester

Whither Worcester

If and when Worcester converts its municipal government from city manager to “strong mayor” rule—a change some hope will take place as early as next year—it will be easy to pinpoint the moment when the move got its start. It was March 16, the day the Worcester City Council unceremoniously dumped City Manager Thomas Hoover,(...)

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The connectors

The connectors

When 250 children joined together to sing at the dedication of the Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge two years ago, it marked the first performance of what would go on to become the Boston Children’s Chorus, a multicultural mix of young voices from throughout Greater Boston. But the harmonies heard that day on the(...)

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Half the battle

Some 50 percent of all Massachusetts voters will get to choose between Democratic and Republican candidates for state representative this fall, thanks to the “Team Reform” slate of GOP contenders being championed by Gov. Mitt Romney. (For where these contests are underway, see Head Count) To the Republican Party, this is a classic case of(...)

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