Fall 2013

Fall 2013

The numbers for the state, Boston show improvement

The numbers for the state, Boston show improvement

The minority hiring records of the state of Massachusetts and the city of Boston are both relatively good

The minority hiring records of the state of Massachusetts and the city of Boston are both relatively good, a sharp contrast to most companies in the private sector. State records for fiscal 2012 indicate that nearly a quarter of the 44,445 executive branch employees are minorities, three times the percentage in 1983 when the Globe(...)

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The zombie coal plant

The zombie coal plant

Environmentalists want to kill off Brayton Point. The Patrick administration says let the market do the dirty work.

Jay O’Hara didn’t have to see the gun to get spooked. The sound of the bullet hitting the chamber of a police officer’s rifle was enough. “I heard the bolt action of the rifle over my shoulder,” O’Hara recalls. “It wasn’t pointed, but it’s locked and loaded. It’s an unmistakable, chilling sound.” O’Hara, a 31-year-old(...)

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No seat at the table

No seat at the table

Despite talk of ‘valuing diversity,’ as well as the encouraging ways that Boston has opened up, the region’s power structure still largely excludes blacks and Hispanics

Boston has come a long way since the days of school busing in the 1970s. The city is far more racially diverse, with blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and other minority groups now accounting for more than half of the city’s population, up from less than a third in 1980. Signs of that diversity are growing. We(...)

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Rocky road

Rocky road

Boston’s Renaissance charter school hits another bump. Is it back on track?

It was an unwelcome, but not unfamiliar, spot for the Renaissance Charter Public School to find itself in. In February, the state Board of Elemen­tary and Secondary Education voted for the second time to place the Boston school on probation because of faltering student achievement. It’s been a long, up and down ride for Renais­sance,(...)

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¡Arriba Lantigua!

¡Arriba Lantigua!

William Lantigua has become a pariah statewide but in Lawrence, the Teflon mayor is fighting for four more years.

“Who are you?” Lawrence Mayor William Lantigua is not happy to see a reporter in his downtown campaign headquarters, much less one who has dropped in unannounced and is busy snapping his picture. The Essex Street storefront, bustling with volunteers on a Friday afternoon before the preliminary election, quiets down. The mayor stops stacking envelopes(...)

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Boston’s transportation ‘war room’

Boston’s transportation ‘war room’

Traffic cams, lights, and parking spots: the high-tech side of dealing with traffic congestion

When it comes to Boston’s notoriously tangled matrix of streets, which are a challenge for local drivers and a nightmare for visitors brave enough to try navigating them, a seventh-floor command center in City Hall is where a team of engineers does its best to make order out of chaos. The center utilizes a complex(...)

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Boston’s oracle

Boston’s oracle

As both practitioner and interpreter, Larry DiCara has spent a lifetime steeped in Boston politics.

Turmoil and Transition in Boston: A Political Memoir from the Busing EraBy Lawrence S. DiCara, with Chris BlackLantham, Hamilton Books234 pages Turmoil and Transition in Boston, the title of Larry DiCara’s memoir, is an apt heading for his chronicle of the city’s busing years, which coincide roughly with the 12 years he spent in politics.(...)

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Fall 2013 Editor’s note

Fall 2013 Editor’s note

Our cover story on minorities in the workplaces of Greater Boston started out small.

Our cover story on minorities in the workplaces of Greater Boston started out small. Contributing writer Colman Herman proposed a story about the racial makeup of the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, the agency charged with bringing three casinos and a slots parlor to the state. Herman thought it was odd that a new agency starting from(...)

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The GOP’s corner office strategy

The GOP’s corner office strategy

Drawing Democrats in big numbers has been the key to a winning formula

While Massachusetts ranks as one of the bluest states in the nation, giving the average Demo­cratic presidential nominee a 20-point advantage over his GOP rival in the last 14 elections, four of the Bay State’s last five governors have been Repub­li­cans—an intriguing paradox. With a wide-open race for governor looming in 2014, Republicans once again(...)

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