Spring 2005

Spring 2005

Growing Pains

Growing Pains

The Road to Whatever: Middle-Class Culture and the Crisis of Adolescence By Elliott Currie New York, Metropolitan Books, 320 pages. Criminologists have been so engaged in trying to explain and combat violence committed by impoverished inner-city youngsters that they haven’t taken much notice of middle-class youth who are profoundly in trouble. According to University of(...)

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Statistically Significant

Statistically Significant

Illustrations By Travis Foster CREEPING UP TO HUB HOME PRICES According to the National Association of Realtors, the Boston housing market stood out for not registering double-digit percentage increases in home sales during the last quarter of 2004. The median sales price for a single-family home in the metropolitan area was $389,000, an increase of(...)

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Risk takings

Dozens of state governments are increasing their dependence on revenues from lotteries and casinos, but even without slots and table games Massachusetts is near the head of the pack. In fiscal year 2002, revenue from gambling activities, almost all of it from the state lottery, accounted for 4.24 percent of the state’s total revenue, up(...)

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Sense of Loss

Sense of Loss

Population drop may have been a fluke, but slow growth has its costs By Robert David Sullivan Coming at the end of a year when Massachusetts had more than its fair share of the national spotlight (thanks to football, baseball, and presidential politics), it was disconcerting to learn that we were the only state in(...)

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Former political activist Jim Braude wins converts as a broadcast news star

Former political activist Jim Braude wins converts as a broadcast news star

It’s hour two of the Wilfredo Laboy Telethon, and Jim Braude and Margery Eagan have managed to raise only $37. But since the telephone lines are lit up—with callers ready to pile on, rather than shell out—they’re hardly disappointed. Jim Braude: Now going solo on New England Cable News. The paltry sum isn’t that surprising,(...)

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For the good of our economy the next phase of education reform must aim higher

For the good of our economy the next phase of education reform must aim higher

The recent news that Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble was buying the Gillette Co. set off the predictable round of hand wringing about Boston’s future. Yet the vibrancy of the Massachusetts economy, driven as it is by the Boston region, will depend little on the presence of this or that company headquarters, poignant though their loss(...)

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Past their prime

Past their prime

According to 2003 estimates from the Census Bureau, 126 of the state’s 351 communities (shaded on the larger map below) are now short of their population peaks. In some cases, such as Cohasset, Natick, and Woburn, the high-water mark came in 2002, and the population drops have been tiny. But the cities of Chelsea, Everett,(...)

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