Summer 2000

Summer 2000

The Color of Justice

The Color of Justice

When it comes to drug cases, Judge Sydney Hanlon knows what she’s looking at. As presiding justice of Dorchester District Court, she runs Boston’s busiest community court, with 8,636 criminal complaints filed there last year. In narcotics charges, only one court in the city and three others in the state see more action than hers.(...)

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Mending Town Gown

Evan Dobelle knew that Trinity College had an image problem when he took over as president in 1995—that’s why he was hired. But the perspective of a hotel doorman helped bring the college’s local reputation into sharp relief. Having just arrived in Hartford, Dobelle was checking into the downtown Sheraton when the doorman stopped him.(...)

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Big Man On Campus

Here he is at the State House, it’s that time of year, and he just can’t help himself. After quoting the Roman statesman Seneca-“Loyalty is the holiest good in the human heart”-threatening to sing, actually singing a little, recognizing the pols in the audience (“I saw Stan Rosenberg a few minutes ago, where is he?”),(...)

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Two views of suburbia

Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American DreamBy Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff SpeckNorth Point Press, New York, 2000, 256 pages Picture Windows: How the Suburbs HappenedBy Rosalyn Baxandall and Elizabeth Ewen Basic Books, New York, 2000, 298 pages. Cynthia Martin, née Fabiano, and all 13 of her siblings(...)

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Where were their neighborsand elected officialswhen the Foxborough trailerpark residents needed them

The special town meeting in Foxborough on December 6 was a civic gathering unlike any other in the town’s history. A tent and heaters were set up outside Foxborough High School to accommodate the overflow as a record crowd of 2,334 residents–out of a possible 10,000 voters–turned out to decide whether the New England Patriots(...)

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The daddy track

A little time off at birth doesn’t solve the working-parent dilemma So Tony Blair is back at the office, his parental leave fading into memory. The arrival of little Leo gave rise all too briefly to earnest adult rumination about work, gender roles, and child care. But it’s not too late to parse the chatter.(...)

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Civic Engagement

In his new book, Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, Harvard sociologist Robert Putnam attempts to quantify what he views as the crumbling character of American civic life by taking a closer look at public attitudes and community participation. Among the 48 continental states, Massachusetts fares better than most. In Putnam’s composite(...)

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