Summer 2003

Summer 2003

Mass production

Mass production

MORE THAN A dozen executives from high-tech companies doing business in Massachusetts are seated around a rectangle of wooden tables in the Governor’s Council chambers in the State House. They’ve been invited for a “technology summit” to discuss the challenges facing business with Gov. Mitt Romney and his top deputies on economic affairs, Robert Pozen(...)

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College Credit

College Credit

Ben Lieberman’s tiny office on the third floor of the old Miller Building is crammed with books. In his 10 years at Fitchburg State College, the associate professor of history has done research ranging from the Weimar Republic to “ethnic cleansing” in both the Holocaust and the Balkans. At Fitchburg State, he says, he’s been(...)

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Soft touches

Soft touches

Charities are advised to stay close to Boston–or head a bit to the west–when shaking their tin cans. The Catalogue for Philanthropy, a consortium of nonprofits that says it “promotes philanthropy itself,” recently released its latest Massachusetts Generosity Index, which ranks 333 Bay State cities and towns by their level of giving. The name is(...)

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Public higher ed deserves attentionand some respect

As viewed from the peanut gallery, the struggle over Gov. Mitt Romney’s government-reorganization plan has been a fascinating, if at times horrifying, spectacle. When the plan was outlined in the governor’s budget proposal, the Legislature’s first reaction–from a collection of House task forces that summarily rejected nearly every element, one after another–sparked references in my(...)

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Letters

Mark Jurkowitz did a fine job telling a rather complex story in “Gale force” (Spring 2003). However, I am compelled to add clarity to three points: 1) the Cape Cod Times‘ ability to separate news and opinion, 2) our motivation for opposing the Cape Wind proposal, and 3) why we voiced our opposition early in(...)

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Sociologist Theda Skocpol worries that the demise of the Odd Fellows and the rise of advocacy groups leave citizens with nothing to do

Sociologist Theda Skocpol worries that the demise of the Odd Fellows and the rise of advocacy groups leave citizens with nothing to do

Though the title was created for sardonic effect by Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam, whose use of it always drips with sarcasm, here’s one small reason Harvard might well be considered the World’s Greatest University: In almost any grave scholarly dispute, disputants on both (or all) sides can be found right there on the Cambridge(...)

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