Winter 1998

Winter 1998

Argument

Bailing out the utilities is no way to bring competition to the electric industry Picture this: a forum in downtown Boston on the major economic development issue of the decade. The panelists include Ralph Nader and the head of the Heritage Foundation; libertarian Barbara Anderson and statist Jim Braude; gubernatorial contenders Joe Malone, Patricia McGovern,(...)

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Regionalization

Every few years, debates about the need for regional government kick up in Massachusetts like a sudden gust of wind, and then quietly die down again. Boston saw a push toward metropolitan government in the latter years of the last century, as the city annexed nearby towns such as Dorchester and Charlestown, and Frederick Law(...)

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Military Metamorphosis

When the federal government decided to close Fort Devens in 1991, it opened a $350 million hole in the Massachusetts economy. The Army base was the state’s second largest employer, supporting 9,000 military, civilian and community jobs. The sprawling 9,300-acre complex west of Route 495 served as the economic backbone for the surrounding towns of(...)

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Making Movies

The shark in “Jaws” terrorizes tourists at an Edgartown beach… Jack Nicholson resides at an Ipswich mansion in “The Witches of Eastwick”… Richard Dreyfuss frequents an Arlington rotary in “Once Around”… A North Shore island stands in for 17th-century Salem in “The Crucible.” An official film tour of Massachusetts may not yet be ready for(...)

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Entrepreneurial Training

The first time John Janeczek was laid off — from a marketing job at Pittsfield giant General Electric — he scoured the want ads, fired off resumes and landed a new position in a couple of months. But when the marketing department at paper machinery manufacturer Beloit Corp. folded a few weeks later and he(...)

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A Technology Evangelist

For someone who calls himself an “evangelist,” Ken Granderson looks little like the local preacher. Wearing a pressed white shirt, paisley tie and round tortoise-shell glasses, he clicks away at a keyboard, making figures flash across one of the dozen computer screens in his cluttered Dorchester apartment. Laptop to his left, Internet on his right,(...)

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The Secrets of Her Success

The mystique starts with her name. Orit Gadiesh. How do you pronounce it anyway? Is she Arab? Israeli, then. Almost six feet tall in four-inch heels. Rumored to have been a tank commander in the Israeli Army. And her hair? It’s purple. Really. This straight-talking woman with short black skirts and chunky jewelry has made(...)

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The Death and Life of an Empowerment Zone

The Death and Life of an Empowerment Zone

Pat Cusick, a longtime fighter for the low-income residents of Boston’s South End, ought to know better than to get his hopes up. As executive director of the South End Neighborhood Action Program, or SNAP, Cusick has seen government programs — urban renewal, Model Cities, enterprise zones — come and go, sometimes helping, sometimes hurting,(...)

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The Business Climate

The Business Climate

In the eyes of the political partisan, the world is made up of (1) the enemy, (2) crusaders against the enemy, and (3) compromisers, middle-of-the-roaders, and weak-kneed trimmers who defer to the powers-that-be. This is not a bad formulation, as far as it goes, and politics would not be politics without it. But it does(...)

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