Winter 2006

Winter 2006

Letters

Loved Mark Murphy’s article (“Rooting for the Home Team,” CW, Fall ’05) about minor-league and indy-league ballclubs in Massachusetts. I’m a fan of the North Shore Spirit, who play at Fraser Field in Lynn. I look forward to opening day every year. I pay $5 for a bleacher seat along the first base line and(...)

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“Strapped” author Tamara Draut explains why young adults arent getting ahead

“Strapped” author Tamara Draut explains why young adults arent getting ahead

In her new book, Strapped: Why America’s 20- and 30-Somethings Can’t Get Ahead, Tamara Draut crunches numbers and interviews young adults across the country to show how, for the generations following the Baby Boomers, the transition to full-fledged adulthood—living on your own, launching a career, starting a family—has become difficult to accomplish without going broke.(...)

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Turning 10

Turning 10

In 1996, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was at about 4,000 and just beginning its dizzying five-year runup to more than 11,000. The United States was in the midst of the longest period of sustained economic growth on record. Wealth was being created on a scale not seen in our history. In politics, Bill Weld(...)

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As jobs go off the books immigrants edge out some nativeborn workers

As jobs go off the books immigrants edge out some nativeborn workers

The economic recovery from the recession of 2001, both nationally and in Massachusetts, has been not only mixed, but also puzzling in a number of key respects. Nationally, growth has been fairly robust in Gross Domestic Product and corporate profits, and housing prices have risen rapidly in both the state and the nation through the(...)

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Local officials warned against chatting about town business online

Local officials warned against chatting about town business online

Winter 2006 ROWLEY—The Internet has made shopping, paying bills, reading the newspaper, and, it turns out, breaking the state’s Open Meeting Law more convenient than ever. Fifteen years ago, if town officials wanted to circumvent the law, which prohibits a majority of a municipal governing body from discussing public business in private, they would have(...)

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