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T notes: South Coast Rail optimism grows

T notes: South Coast Rail optimism grows

Keolis charts progress after 4 years on job

STATE TRANSPORTATION OFFICIALS still need to work out how to pay for South Coast Rail and who should be in charge of the first phase of its construction, but on Monday they sounded as if the long-delayed project was a go. James Eng, the deputy rail administrator for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, sought and(...)

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T official: We’re good on revenues right now

T official: We’re good on revenues right now

Capital spending ramping up dramatically at transit agency

THE MBTA’S CHIEF ADMINISTRATOR said on Monday that the transit agency doesn’t need new revenues in the near term, but he said the situation could change in the future. “In the current fiscal year, on the operating side and the five-year capital investment program, we do not need more money. We’re fully funded. Longer term,(...)

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T pares back parking hikes at Braintree, Quincy-Adams

T pares back parking hikes at Braintree, Quincy-Adams

Mayor of Braintree says increases defy logic, aren’t fair

IN RESPONSE TO PUSHBACK from Quincy and Braintree elected officials, the MBTA on Monday announced it would hike parking rates on September 1 rather than August 1 and cut the size of the weekday price hike at the heavily used Braintree and Quincy Adams garages from $3 to $2. T officials said the revisions, apparently(...)

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Are we doing enough on clean energy?

Are we doing enough on clean energy?

Beacon Hill debate is mostly about hydro vs. solar and wind

Massachusetts is in the midst of procuring vast amounts of clean energy, but on Beacon Hill clean energy advocates say the state isn’t doing nearly enough. The Senate approved legislation that would triple the annual increase in renewable energy purchases. The House last week took up a bill that would have doubled the annual increase,(...)

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Raise the Renewable Portfolio Standard

Raise the Renewable Portfolio Standard

A boost is needed to help state meet emissions goals

AS THE LEGISLATIVE SESSION draws to an end, state lawmakers are considering bills that would increase the annual growth rate of the Massachusetts Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). As these proposals move ahead, it is important that decision-makers not be deterred by unsubstantiated claims made by opponents that an RPS increase is incompatible with procurements of hydroelectricity required by statute (Section 83D) or will undermine compliance with the state’s Clean Energy Standard (CES). This argument(...)

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Raise the Renewable Portfolio Standard II

Raise the Renewable Portfolio Standard II

Boost is needed to keep up with other states

WIND HAS POWERED Massachusetts’ economic prosperity before, and it is poised to do so again. Two hundred years ago, whalers harnessed wind off the coasts of New Bedford, Cape Cod, and Cape Ann, charting a course for whale oil to light up our region and economy. Today, our communities are again racing into the wind(...)

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National Grid explains its lockout

National Grid explains its lockout

'We've never made a harder decision'

AT NATIONAL GRID, we’ve always taken pride in our ability to negotiate fair, multiyear labor contracts with our unions and to provide robust compensation packages to our employees, who provide important services to our gas and electric customers. We are a heavily unionized company.  We have about 10,000 unionized employees in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and(...)

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Citizenship question doesn’t belong on census form

Citizenship question doesn’t belong on census form

Stakes are high for Mass. and cities like Lawrence, Springfield

THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES sensibly requires that we “count the whole number of persons in each state” every 10 years. The results of the census are used to determine representation in Congress, and therefore the number of Electoral College votes each state gets. It is also used to allocate federal funds for, among(...)

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Electricity trick or treat?

Electricity trick or treat?

Pro and con: Do competitive electricity suppliers help or hurt in Massachusetts?

Well-intentioned law has been corrupted by con men BY DANIEL STEVENS AS SUMMER SWINGS into high gear, our electric bills do, too. Modern life dictates that we need power to keep us cool. To try and reduce electricity prices for people living in Massachusetts, a few years ago, the state Legislature created a program called(...)

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