Recent Stories

Healey unveils new public records policy

Wording vague on how transparent she will be

GOV. MAURA HEALEY unveiled a new public records policy on her office’s website on Monday, but the wording leaves a lot of questions unanswered. Previous governors going all the way back to Paul Cellucci have cited a 1997 Supreme Judicial Court case to say the governor’s office is not covered by the public records law,(...)

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Healey administration should insist on measuring equity in education

It's not enough to support expansion of programs geared toward college and career readiness

GOV. HEALEY HAS good work to build upon when it comes to helping students of color enroll and succeed in college. The governor supports expanding “college-in-high school” initiatives as a way of addressing equity issues in college success. Investment in expanding these important programs makes good sense given the demographic and labor force challenges facing(...)

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Addressing the nitrogen challenge on Cape Cod

STATE GOVERNMENT OFTEN seems distant from the everyday lives of Massachusetts residents, but that’s not true these days on Cape Cod.  The state Department of Environmental Protection has issued draft regulations that could require thousands of Cape residents to upgrade or replace their septic systems – or scrap their septic systems altogether and go with(...)

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Addressing the nitrogen challenge on Cape Cod

Two experts agree on a lot, but still at odds

STATE GOVERNMENT OFTEN seems distant from the everyday lives of Massachusetts residents, but that’s not true these days on Cape Cod.  The state Department of Environmental Protection has issued draft regulations that could require thousands of Cape residents to upgrade or replace their septic systems – or scrap their septic systems altogether and go with(...)

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A new MBTA board of directors is needed urgently

Healey could make three new appointments immediately

THE HEADLINE spoke volumes. As the MBTA’s interim general manager laid out a comprehensive presentation on the history and current status of the troubled procurement of new Red and Orange Line cars, the MBTA’s board sat silent and “asked no questions.” It was a jaw dropping, but unsurprising headline, describing the behavior of a board(...)

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3 key steps for moving forward with telehealth

Coordinating care across state lines could be crucial

AT THE OUTSET of the pandemic, payers, policymakers, and providers at the local, state, and national levels rallied to rapidly expand the financial and technological infrastructure around telemedicine services. Such coordinated responses were critical to ensuring sustained, high-value, high-quality care for patients across our nation. Massachusetts specifically engaged several future-oriented telehealth services to better serve(...)

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Budd urges more increases in state legal aid

Says nearly half needing assistance don't get it

STATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE THE TOP STATE judge in Massachusetts wants lawmakers to make more funding available for low-income Bay Staters to get legal representation in civil matters, warning that recent investments still have not done enough to ensure access for those in need. At an annual event highlighting the civil legal aid system, Supreme Judicial(...)

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Atrius sale to Optum will yield health conversion foundation

In the past, such spinoffs have been forces for good

THE LOCAL NONPROFIT Atrius Health physician practice organization has been cleared for sale to national for-profit Optum Health, a subsidiary of investor-owned United Healthcare. Legally, the proceeds must be directed toward charitable purposes. We each run health conversion foundations and know that conversions can continue the health legacy of their prior organizations and be forces(...)

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Divided Congress could be good for Biden

History suggests a Democratic president should fare well

IN JUNE 1858, Abraham Lincoln famously said “A house divided against itself can not stand.” Now, 165 years later, the 118th Congress has officially begun and the divide is deeper than we have seen in generations. The Democrats remain in control of the Senate while a new Republican majority takes over in the House – truly(...)

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Healey should settle, not litigate, disability lawsuit

Avoid unnecessary institutionalization in nursing homes

EVERY DAY, thousands of Massachusetts residents with disabilities are admitted to segregated nursing facilities, be it to recover from medical procedures, to receive respite and care because they’re homeless, or because of a lack supportive services that are needed to remain at home and in their communities. While many eventually leave, thousands do not, even(...)

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